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Biden Admin Approves Single Largest Increase in Food Stamps History

Democratic leadership brings the US one step closer to a government-dependent socialist nation

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The coronavirus pandemic has allowed liberals and Democratic leadership to bring the United States one step closer to a government-dependent socialist nation. Beginning in October of this year, the food stamp assistance program will see its single largest increase in history.

The Associated Press reports “The Biden administration has approved a significant and permanent increase in the levels of food stamp assistance available to needy families – the largest single increase in the program’s history.”

Officially known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), assistance will increase by over 25% more than pre-pandemic levels for the roughly 42 million SNAP beneficiaries or 12 percent of the population. The aid package increases the average monthly per-person benefits from $121 to $157.

The Associated Press reports:

The increase is part of a multi-pronged Biden administration effort to strengthen the country’s social safety net. Poverty and food security activists maintain that longstanding inadequacies in that safety net were laid bare by the COVID-19 pandemic, presenting an opportunity to make generational improvements that reach beyond the current public health crisis.

Activists say the previous levels of pre-pandemic SNAP assistance simply weren’t enough, forcing many households to choose cheaper, less nutritious options or simply go hungry as the funds ran low toward the end of the month.

Stacy Dean, deputy undersecretary for food, nutrition and consumer services said in a report, “To set SNAP families up for success, we need a Thrifty Food Plan that supports current dietary guidance on a budget.” She added, “Too many of our fellow Americans struggle to afford healthy meals. The revised plan is one step toward getting them the support they need to feed their families.”

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3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Donnie Bowin

    August 16, 2021 at 1:23 pm

    He and the communist left cause inflation and joblessness to rise so they can rush in and save the needy from starvation at the cost to the American taxpayers. Everything the communist left does is for the sake of their own power and demolition of the greatest capitalist society know to mankind. All they have ever done is to create a problem so they can fix the problem they created while blaming it on someone [Trump] else and then brag about the problem being solved of which they created!

  2. Gwyllim

    August 16, 2021 at 1:41 pm

    What about Social Security? The government has been pilfering that for decades.

  3. bv

    August 17, 2021 at 9:36 am

    Typical dem strategy, dumb down people& control them with food stamps – that’s exactly dems have bern doing with the black community!

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Economy

Inflation Spiked 7% Past Year, Highest Since 1982

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With a 7% spike from last year, inflation has increased at its fastest pace in 40 years. On Wednesday, the labor department reported its measure of inflation “that excludes volatile food and gas prices jumped 5.5% in December, the fastest such increase since 1991. Inflation rose 0.5% overall from November, down from 0.8% the previous month” reports the Associated Press.

National Review reports “the consumer price index, a major inflation gauge, for all items surged 0.5 percent for the month and 7.0 percent for the last twelve months ending in December, representing the largest annual spike since June 1982, when inflation hit 7.1 percent.”

Housing prices and used cars and trucks contributed the most weight to the all items surge. But prices for cars, gas, food and furniture all rose sharply as part of a rapid recovery from the pandemic recession, “that was fueled by vast infusions of government aid and emergency intervention by the Fed, which slashed interest rates.”

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testified before the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Tuesday, warning monetary policy is constrained in its power to curb inflation by the current “era of persistently low interest rates.” Ordinarily, the Fed can hike rates to slow down an overheating economy.

“Recovering from the pandemic, the economy has rebounded well but a bit too fast for many moving parts to catch up to, Powell noted, as supply chains still struggle to meet demand across consumer sectors, resulting in inventory shortages on store shelves and prolonged shipping delays” reports National Review.

“The economy has rapidly gained strength despite the ongoing pandemic, giving rise to persistent supply and demand imbalances and bottlenecks, and thus to elevated inflation. We know that high inflation exacts a toll, particularly for those less able to meet the higher costs of essentials like food, housing, and transportation,” said Powell.

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Economy

Federal Debt Equals Roughly $287,859 Per Income-Tax-Paying Household

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National Debt Clock
National Debt Clock

The Biden administration wants to increase any taxes they can get their grubby hands-on, and CNS News explains why: because they need it. In an analysis, CNS writes about how as Congress “worked in recent days to increase the legal limit on the federal debt, the Treasury kept that debt artificially frozen at approximately $28.9 trillion, where it stood at the beginning of this week.”

With the limit lifted, the federal debt will increase, “then keep steadily climbing, constantly increasing the burden on future taxpayers.” Here’s the analysis:

In 2018, according to the last complete annual report on individual income tax returns published by the Internal Revenue Service, there were 100,424,240 households in the United States that filed what the IRS calls a “taxable return.” “The taxable and nontaxable classification of a return for this report is determined by the presence of ‘total income tax,'” explained the IRS.

“‘Total income tax,'” it said, “was the sum of income tax after credits.”

In other words, the 100,424,240 households that filed a “taxable return” in 2018 actually paid income taxes to the federal government.

If you divide the $28,908,004,857,445 in debt that the federal government owed before the debt limit was liftedby the 100,424,240 American households that paid net income taxes in 2018, it works out to approximately $287,859 per income-tax-paying household.

In order to understand the magnitude of what this means, CNS compares numbers to 1989:

The year that President Ronald Reagan left office, there were 89,178,355 income-tax-paying households in the United States, according to the IRS. At the end of January that year, the federal debt was $2,697,957,000,000.

That means the federal debt then equaled approximately $30,253 per income-tax-paying household.

Even when the January 1989 federal debt of $30,253 per income-tax-paying household is adjusted into November 2021 dollars (using the Bureau of Labor Statistics inflation calculator), it equals only approximately $69,437.

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