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CDC Reports Childhood Obesity Soared During Pandemic

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Childhood Obesity

As the controversial debate over children wearing masks to school rages on, there are many consequences imposed on children that the adults in charge must consider. Anxiety, depression, social and mental cognizance and even suicide has skyrocketed

The American Medical Association (AMA) has reported that nearly 78 percent of all “U.S. patients hospitalized with COVID-19 were overweight or had obesity.” However, as politicians and bureaucrats implemented stricter and stricter isolation mandates in hopes of “stopping the spread” the result was even more obesity. Sadly, it occurred among our most vulnerable population; children.

As the controversial debate over children wearing masks to school rages on, there are many consequences imposed on children that the adults in charge must consider. Anxiety, depression, social and mental cognizance and even suicide have all skyrocketed since the beginning of the pandemic. The pandemic of childhood obesity has also become more tragic.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) the devastating result was that children doubled their Body Mass Index (BMI). “Among a cohort of 432,302 persons aged 2–19 years, the rate of body mass index (BMI) increase approximately doubled during the pandemic compared to a prepandemic period,” the CDC stated.

Reasons behind the occurrence are clear. The CDC report stated, “The COVID-19 pandemic led to school closures, disrupted routines, increased stress, and less opportunity for physical activity and proper nutrition, leading to weight gain among children and adolescents.”

Children aged 6-11 had “experienced the largest increase in their rate of BMI change.” Those who already struggled with weight before the pandemic reportedly “experienced the largest increases” in weight gain.

From March and November of 2020 the CDC discovered that persons with “moderate or severe obesity gained on average 1.0 and 1.2 pounds per month,” resulting in a 6.1 to 7.3-pound increase over a period of six months.

Even healthier children with lower BMIs saw a 2.7 increase over the same period of time. The CDC noted that school closures “might have reduced” the possibility of children engaging in physical activity and eating healthier meals.

The CDC report stated:

During the pandemic, many early child care and education settings and schools experienced closures, leading to online or hybrid learning environments. This might have reduced the ability for some children to engage in structured physical activity and receive healthy meals. As venues serving youth reopen, it is important to acknowledge the potential indirect consequences of the pandemic and provide children, adolescents, and families with ample opportunities for proper nutrition and regular physical activity.

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