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D.C. Elementary School Gives Children ‘Fistbooks’ to identify ‘racist family members’, identify their own ‘white privilege’

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The obsession liberals have for infiltrating the minds of children is increasingly dangerous. A Washington, D.C. public elementary school gave children as young as 4 in Pre-Kindergarten, through 3rd grade, “Anti-Racism Fight Club Fistbook for Kids.”

The book shows white and black drawn characters; the cover is a Black figure holding a sign above the head, as if in a protest, that reads “ARFC Fistbook for kids.” Underneath the drawing reads (It’s a Fight Club. We don’t do “handbooks.”)

The purpose of the book is for children to identify their own racist tendencies, as well as identify “racist members” of their family. “As part of this work, each student has a fist book to help continue the dialogue at school and home,” a letter from the Janney Elementary School Principal Danielle Singh explained.

“We recognize that any time we engage topics such as race and equity, we may experience a variety of emotions. This is a normal part of the learning and growing process. As a school community we want to continue the dialogue with our students and understand this is just the beginning” the letter continued.

“Anti-Racism Fight Club Fistbook for Kids” explains that “white people are a part of a society that benefits them in almost every instance,” and that “it’s as if white people walk around with an invisible force field because they hold all of the power in America.”
“If you are a white person, white privilege is something you were born with and it simply means that your life is not more difficult due to the color of your skin,” the “Fistbook for Kids” explains.

“Put differently, it’s not your fault for having white privilege, but it is your fault if you choose to ignore it.” The “Fistbook for Kids” says anti-racism “isn’t a spectator sport” but requires “being loud, uncomfortable, confrontational and visible to ensure change is made.”

A series of questions in the book asks children, “Where do you see racism in yourself? This requires true soul-searching. Be real with yourself, don’t feel guilt/shame and own it. It’s the first step in becoming an anti-racist.”

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