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COVID-19

Fauci calls WHO ‘flawed organization,’ investment in Operation Warp Speed was ‘very smart’

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In a Fox News interview with Bill Hemmer, Dr. Anthony Fauci discussed everything from the coronavirus vaccine to holiday suggestions and even the World Health Organization. 

Fauci said that at the time he took his position in 1984, he never could have imagined a vaccine getting approved for distribution so quickly. 

“It would have been unimaginable at the time I took the position as director of this institute where vaccines, from the time you actually identified the particular pathogen – generally a virus – to the time you got it approved and ready to put into people would be measured in several years,” he said.  

“It’s a testimony to the advances in biomedical research and technology as well as the enormous amount of resources that have been poured into Operation Warp Speed to make this possible with this vaccine and other candidates that are on the pipeline,” he added.  

Fauci explained that “the technology is the thing that did it and it’s also the nature of the virus itself.” 

While many have criticized President Trump for his efforts in Operation Warp Speed, Fauci said that the investment made was “very very smart.” 

“What happened is that the investment that was made in Operation Warp Speed was a very very smart, important investment because what one does with that, you combine the exquisite nature of the technology which allowed you to do it quickly with an investment that in fact makes the process go much more quickly because instead of waiting for one endpoint to go to the next to the next,  you make a risky investment,” he said. 

“The risk is not the safety, the risk is not the scientific integrity, the risk is the money…if it doesn’t work, you lost a lot of money,” he added.  

In terms of timing for the vaccine, Fauci explained that distribution will occur in tiers. 

“By likely the end of December, the people who are in the first tier of prioritization, which has not yet been determined, it will be determined by the CDC together with advice from the advisory committee on immunization practices. It’s likely going to be people who are healthcare workers and high risk people.” 

While the CDC and leadership in several states are urging people not to celebrate Thanksgiving, Fauci said that every family should do what they feel is best for them. 

“You can’t make one prescriptive determination for everyone. Everyone is different. Everyone has a different feel for the type of risks they would like to take,” he said. 

“The circumstances within families are different. So the only thing that I called for at the press briefing at the White House yesterday was that each individual family unit do a risk benefit determination that works for you because there are some families that want to just have the family unit that lives in the house. There are a lot of others that are going to want to have visitors come in. So you say to yourself, ‘do we have in our family a vulnerable person, an elderly person?’ You’ve got to make your determination as an individual family unit. I don’t say that this is the rules everyone should do, I’m just asking, pause for a moment and do a determination of the risk benefit within your family group and then when you make your decision, that’s your decision.” 

When asked about his opinion on the WHO, Fauci said he agrees with President Trump that it is a flawed organization. 

“The president makes some good points that it is a flawed organization. His approach was that if that’s the case, we’re getting out until they fix it and I would say let’s try and fix it as we’re moving along because the world does need a WHO. So we both agree that it is a flawed organization but how you address that flaw might be different.” 

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1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Josef Ogwapit

    November 24, 2020 at 8:34 am

    Hello Fauci now you are talking sense when it is too late! You sided with the left now it is going to haunt you for the rest of your life

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COVID-19

California Town Declares Itself ‘Constitutional Republic’ in Defiance of COVID Vaccine Mandates

As a constitutional republic, leaders “pledge to fight mandates they say go too far” reports the San Francisco Gate.

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Oroville, California
Oroville, California

One California town is utilizing the U.S. Constitution and rejecting Governor Gavin Newsom’s mandate that requires schoolchildren to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Oroville, California has officially declared itself a “constitutional republic.” As a constitutional republic, leaders “pledge to fight mandates they say go too far” reports the San Francisco Gate.

Oroville’s Vice Mayor Scott Thomson is the father of two young boys and says the mandate for children was the straw that broke the camel’s back. “He believed the government had no right to tell him what to put into his, or his children’s bodies. Many of his constituents agreed when it came to pandemic mandates” writes the SF Gate.

Thomson felt he and his constituents were left with no choice, and so he declared Oroville a constitutional republic. The declaration passed by the City Council reads:

“Any executive orders issued by the State of California or by the United States federal government that are overreaching or clearly violate our constitutionally protected rights will not be enforced by the City of Oroville against its citizens”

Thomson has said that “the desire here is dialogue” rather than sweeping mandates. Oroville is a city of only 20,000 but is rapidly growing, as in recent years it has determined itself to be a sanctuary of place “otherwise exempt from some liberal ideal.”

Oroville is not the first California town to be rebelling. Two years ago, the town of Needles became a “sanctuary city” for the Second Amendment. The move was in defiance of California’s strict gun control laws.

Other towns such as Atwater and Coalinga declared themselves as a “sanctuary city for business” and a town where all businesses are essential, as a consequence of the state’s strict pandemic shutdown orders.

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COVID-19

Federal Judge Blocks Biden’s Federal Contractor Vaccine Mandate

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Vaccine

A federal judge in Kentucky issued a preliminary injunction on Tuesday against President Biden’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate for federal contractors and subcontractors.

“U.S. District Judge Gregory F. Van Tatenhove, who serves the Eastern District of Kentucky, issued the opinion and order Tuesday afternoon,” the Lexington Herald Leader reported. “It came in response to a challenge from Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron, who joined many other state attorneys general in challenging the mandate.”

“This is not a case about whether vaccines are effective. They are,” Van Tatenhove wrote. “Nor is this a case about whether the government, at some level, and in some circumstances, can require citizens to obtain vaccines. It can.”

He explained that the case was about if Biden could impose vaccines on the employees of government contractors and subcontractors, which “in all likelihood, the answer to that question is no,” he said.

The ruling comes the day after a different federal judge placed a halt on Biden’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate for U.S. workers, calling the requirement a “politically and economically vast, federalism-altering, and boundary-pushing mandate.”

“The scale falls clearly in favor of healthcare facilities operating with some unvaccinated employees, staff, trainees, students, volunteers and contractors, rather than the swift, irremediable impact of requiring healthcare facilities to choose between two undesirable choices — providing substandard care or providing no healthcare at all,” U.S. District Judge Matthew Schelp wrote in a 32-page order.

The New York Post explained, the “requirement would have affected more than 17 million workers in about 76,000 health care facilities and home health care providers. Under the rule, announced Nov. 4, those affected would have to get their first dose of a vaccine by Dec. 6 and their second shot by Jan. 4.”

“A previous ruling against the Biden administration temporarily blocked a rule that private businesses with more than 100 employees require workers to be vaccinated or face weekly testing,” the Post added.

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