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CDC holiday guidelines urge no singing, hugging, drinking

The CDC would prefer you skip the celebrations altogether. 

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Apparently this year, the best way to spread holiday cheer is staying far away from your family, instead of near. 

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control released Thanksgiving coronavirus guidelines last week that strongly advise against virtually everything that makes the holiday special. 

The guidelines recommend not drinking alcohol because it “make[s] it more difficult to practice COVID-19 safety measures,” encourage to “avoid singing” and even suggest to “keep music levels down” so no one has to “shout or speak loudly,” which they say could increase the risk of transmission. 

While these suggestions are available to those who plan to celebrate the holiday in a semi-normal fashion, the CDC would prefer you skip the celebrations altogether. 

“Celebrating virtually…poses the lowest risk for spread,” the guidelines state. 

Social media was flooded with reactions from tons of users unhappy with the recommendations who still plan to celebrate Thanksgiving. 

One of the most notable to speak out was White House Coronavirus Task Force member Dr. Scott Atlas. 

“This kind of isolation is a tragedy of the elderly who are now being told ‘don’t see your family at Thanksgiving.’ For many people, this is their final Thanksgiving, believe it or no,” he said in a Fox News interview. 

“We have to have a policy…which is a whole person policy. It’s not just about stopping cases of Covid,” he continued. 

A number of Democrat-run cities across America have taken it so far as to cancel the holiday all together. 

Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker, a Democrat, issued a lockdown to go in effect Friday, demanding home gatherings be limited to just “household members.” 

California Gov. Newsom also implemented strict guidelines, mandating all celebrations to be held outside. 

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COVID-19

Federal Judge Blocks Biden’s Federal Contractor Vaccine Mandate

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Vaccine

A federal judge in Kentucky issued a preliminary injunction on Tuesday against President Biden’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate for federal contractors and subcontractors.

“U.S. District Judge Gregory F. Van Tatenhove, who serves the Eastern District of Kentucky, issued the opinion and order Tuesday afternoon,” the Lexington Herald Leader reported. “It came in response to a challenge from Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron, who joined many other state attorneys general in challenging the mandate.”

“This is not a case about whether vaccines are effective. They are,” Van Tatenhove wrote. “Nor is this a case about whether the government, at some level, and in some circumstances, can require citizens to obtain vaccines. It can.”

He explained that the case was about if Biden could impose vaccines on the employees of government contractors and subcontractors, which “in all likelihood, the answer to that question is no,” he said.

The ruling comes the day after a different federal judge placed a halt on Biden’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate for U.S. workers, calling the requirement a “politically and economically vast, federalism-altering, and boundary-pushing mandate.”

“The scale falls clearly in favor of healthcare facilities operating with some unvaccinated employees, staff, trainees, students, volunteers and contractors, rather than the swift, irremediable impact of requiring healthcare facilities to choose between two undesirable choices — providing substandard care or providing no healthcare at all,” U.S. District Judge Matthew Schelp wrote in a 32-page order.

The New York Post explained, the “requirement would have affected more than 17 million workers in about 76,000 health care facilities and home health care providers. Under the rule, announced Nov. 4, those affected would have to get their first dose of a vaccine by Dec. 6 and their second shot by Jan. 4.”

“A previous ruling against the Biden administration temporarily blocked a rule that private businesses with more than 100 employees require workers to be vaccinated or face weekly testing,” the Post added.

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COVID-19

Aaron Rodgers ‘Misty-Eyed’ After Post-COVID Packers Win, Avoids Talking Vaccine ‘What-Ifs’

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Aaron Rodgers

After more than a week of hate from the liberal media over having not received the COVID-19 vaccination, Green Bay Packers’ Aaron Rodgers shut them up with a major win. Rodgers missed the last Packers game due to having COVID-19, but savored his win on Lambeau Field admitting he was a bit “misty-eyed” as he was greeted with cheers.

Rodgers was 23-for-37 with 292 passing yards and an interception, as Green Bay defeated the Seattle Seahawks 17-0. “I just don’t take these things for granted, walking off the field as a winner. Just walking out with Preston [Smith], who I have so much love and appreciation for, and then hearing that type of response from the crowd, it was a little extra special today,” Rodgers said, via the Packers’ website.

Fox News reports Rodgers created a firestorm with his explanation for being unvaccinated and his reasoning for seeking homeopathic treatments to be “immunized” instead of vaccinated against the coronavirus. He said on his last “Pat McAfee Show” appearance he took responsibility for misleading people.

“Everybody has an opinion and I understand that it’s a very polarizing issue for some individuals but I’m just focusing on the support that I got and it was deep and wide, and greatly appreciated,” Rodgers said Sunday night, via ESPN. “There’s always going to be criticism in this world. I don’t define myself by the criticism but I understand it’s a part of this because this issue is definitely polarizing. But again, I’m just so deeply grateful for all the people that reached out.”

When he was given a hypothetical suggestion about the possibility of missing the Super Bowl because of his vaccination status, Rodgers wasn’t biting on a “what-if” question.

“I don’t really like playing the what-if games. So what I do know is I have more than two months right now where my protocol’s not testing every single day. So that’s kind of the only thing I’m thinking about. I don’t like playing the hypothetical game. Obviously, you’d love to be playing the second weekend in February and hopefully we’re in that position,” he concluded.

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