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Racist Rock: Boulder Removed from UW-Madison ‘Painful History of Discrimination’

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Rock

The University of Wisconsin-Madison is spending somewhere between $30,000 and $75,000 for good use; to move a rock. But not just any rock, no, this is a racist rock. “Chamberlin Rock, located on top of Observatory Hill, is named in honor of Thomas Crowder Chamberlin, a geologist and former university president” reports the Wisconsin State Journal.

However, “for some students of color on campus, the rock represents a painful history of discrimination” the article explains. The 70-ton boulder was removed from the “heart of campus” at 6:30 am Friday morning following demands from students over the past year.

The boulder will be moved to university-owned land southeast of Madison near Lake Kegonsa. In its place, the university plans to place a plaque to honor the former university president. Wisconsin State Journal reports:

The boulder was referred to as a “n——-head” — a commonly used expression in the 1920s to describe any large dark rock — at least once in a 1925 Wisconsin State Journal story. University historians have not found any other time that the term was used but said the Ku Klux Klan was active on campus at that time.

UW-Madison Chancellor Rebecca Blank approved the removal of Chamberlin Rock in January but the Wisconsin Historical Society needed to sign off on the rock’s removal because it was located within 15 feet of a Native American burial site…

… The Black Student Union led the call to remove the rock last summer. Nalah McWhorter, the group’s president and a UW-Madison senior, said in an interview this summer that the demands to remove the boulder had been around even before she arrived on campus three years ago.

“I’m grateful that we have had the opportunity to do this and that the rock will be removed,” she said. “It was our demand, and it was something that we put all the work in for.”

The Black Student Union worked with Wunk Sheek, an Indigenous student organization on campus, to lobby for the rock’s removal.

“We did all these presentations,” McWhorter said. “We went through all of these meetings during an academic year with a lot of other stuff going on, so the work really relied on us, as students, and as Black students.”

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3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Christopher Savell

    August 9, 2021 at 5:31 pm

    Dumb questions. Was that rock costing the school money to the tune of the removal expenses for like every day it was on display? How does the accountant list this expenditure to show it’s benefit for the school and the students? What things are better today? What will be better tomorrow? How will I know? Where’s Joan Rivers yelling OH GROW UP to the students demanding the KKK was there back then so the rock has to go now?

  2. Sue

    August 9, 2021 at 6:39 pm

    This is beyond stupid. We have much more important things to worry about. A rock, really?

  3. Slideglide

    August 10, 2021 at 9:00 am

    🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸♥️♥️♥️♥️🌎🌎🌎🍓🍓🤪🤪

    It makes sense that Democrats want to erase their traditional stance as the “Party of the KKK”, and the continued abusive messages they still ascribe to White America, as if this rock is a symbol of oppression, and not just a rock.

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‘Every Word Of This Is False’: Ted Cruz Factchecks Ilhan Omar’s Attack On Coach Kennedy Prayer Case

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Rep. Ilhan Omar

On Monday night, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) factchecked Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) after she made multiple false claims about the Supreme Court ruling in Kennedy v. Bremerton School District, in which the Court ruled 6-3 that a public high school football coach in Washington state had his First Amendment rights violated when he was punished by his school district for praying on the field after games where students could see.

As previously reported, “In 2008, high school football coach Joseph Kennedy began a tradition of praying at midfield after each game. Over time, his players and even members of the opposing team began to join him. In September 2015, a school administrator addressed the matter with Kennedy after an opposing team complained and the coach briefly stopped his prayers.”

“On October 14, 2015, Kennedy told the school district that he was planning on resuming his prayer tradition at the next game. The school district told the coach that his prayers violated the district’s policy, but Kennedy continued to pray at the next two games. The school district subsequently placed him on administrative leave, banned him from participating in the football program, and refused to renew his contract for the following season. Kennedy took the issue to federal district court, arguing that the school district had violated his First Amendment rights,” the report added.

In response to the Supreme Court ruling in favor of Kennedy, Omar tweeted, “The Supreme Court just ruled that public school teachers can pressure students to join in prayer at public school events but can also retaliate against those that don’t join in. Religious freedom is dead in America.”

“Every word of this is false,” Cruz responded.

Omar’s claim that the Supreme Court’s decision allowed to teachers to “pressure students to join prayer” is false. The Court’s ruling just protected Coach Kennedy’s religious freedom to pray publicly.

Omar was also incorrect in claiming that there would be retaliation against students who did not join Kennedy in prayer – the coach’s tradition of praying after games began with him praying alone at midfield after football games. Kennedy’s school district even noted that Kennedy had “not actively encouraged, or required, participation.”

Additionally, in contrast to Omar’s claim that “religious freedom is dead in America,” the Supreme Court ruling actually strengthened protections of religious freedom.

Writing for the majority opinion, Justice Neil Gorsuch explained, “Respect for religious expressions is indispensable to life in a free and diverse Republic—whether those expressions take place in a sanctuary or on a field, and whether they manifest through the spoken word or a bowed head.”

“Here, a government entity sought to punish an individual for engaging in a brief, quiet, personal religious observance doubly protected by the Free Exercise and Free Speech Clauses of the First Amendment,” Gorsuch added. “And the only meaningful justification the government offered for its reprisal rested on a mistaken view that it had a duty to ferret out and suppress religious observances even as it allows comparable secular speech. The Constitution neither mandates nor tolerates that kind of discrimination. Mr. Kennedy is entitled to summary judgment on his First Amendment claims.”

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Leo Terrell: Not One Democrat Can Justify Roe V. Wade

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Leo Terrell: Not One Democrat Can Justify Roe V. Wade

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