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Salt Lake City Signs Resolution Declaring ‘Racism’ a ‘Public Health Crisis’

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Erin Mendenhall

Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall doesn’t want to be outdone by the Lori Lightfoots or Gretchen Whitmers of the world so she has declared “racism” a “public health crisis.” Mendenhall and seven members of the city council have signed a joint resolution declaring racism a public health crisis.

“We are publicly acknowledging the existence of a grave inequity many in our community have long experienced” the Tuesday press release from the Mayor’s office reads. “A resolution to declare racism a public health crisis was initially proposed to the City by a group of community leaders who are in or working toward health-related careers, and it was reviewed and approved by both the City’s Human Rights Coalition and the Commission on Racial Equity in Policing.”

“This is an important declaration for us to make as a city” Mendenhall was quoted in the press release. “Not only are we publicly acknowledging the existence of a grave inequity that many in our community have known and experienced for so long, but we are also committing ourselves to the creation of policies and ordinances that are anti-racist.”

Here’s how the press release attempts to explain the connection between racism and health:

Racism directly impacts access to numerous everyday resources, including education, housing, employment, and healthcare. The cascading effects are known to result in negative outcomes for physical and mental health.

Over the course of the pandemic, the impacts of racism on public health and the heavier burden on the City’s communities of color have been well documented.

At the height of the pandemic, odds of infection were three times more likely in Glendale and two times more likely in Rose Park, where there are high percentages of Latino and nonwhite residents.

Additionally, Latino communities account for 14.2% of Utah’s population, but 40% of the state’s COVID-19 cases, and American Indian and Alaskan Native communities in Utah had a case fatality rate that is roughly three times higher than the state average.

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Randy

    July 22, 2021 at 1:32 pm

    “They can’t be told, they must be shown”

    Governor has no power, this is what She would’ve done. But didn’t. You’re being “shown”.

  2. Slideglide

    July 23, 2021 at 10:32 am

    Historically, the Democrats have portrayed their party as the protector of the Black community against racist, white Republicans.

    After 150 years of this “protection”, and by their own rhetoric, they have done a miserable job as nothing has changed since the “Jim Crow” days.

    The Democrats never praise the accomplishments of Black Americans and their inclusion into the fabric of our country.

    Leo 2.0 is a prime example by his successful shift from his support of Democrats to the Republican Party, but this political “rebirth” is more of a conversion to Trump than the GOP.

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Race

‘Tis the Season For Social Justice Messages on NFL Helmets, End Zones and Hats

Football season is upon us, despite liberal leadership’s cancel culture in full force

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NFL Social Justice

Football season is upon us, despite liberal leadership’s cancel culture in full force. Stenciled in the helmets this year, players can choose from six phrases: “End Racism,” “Stop Hate,” “It Takes All of Us,” “Black Lives Matter,” “Inspire Change” and “Say their Stories.”

The end zones will read, for the second straight year, “It Takes All of Us” and “End Racism.” The league is also bringing back the “Say Their Stories” initiative and begin a new one where each team will “highlight its social justice work during a regular-season home game in Weeks 17 and 18.”

“We are committed to Inspire Change and the social justice work that inspires change for the long term,” said Anna Isaacson, NFL’s senior vice president of social responsibility. All of the initiatives “will provide a unified time frame for us to further amplify all of the work that our clubs are doing and that will lead into the playoffs where Inspire Change will continue to take center stage” added Isaacson. “The key message for us as the season is starting, we are ramping up again in a big way with our social justice work.”

End zone stencils will remain in place for all home games except when another specific cause is to be recognized, such as the Salute to Service game. “Salute To Service” will replace “End Racism” in one end zone and “It Takes All of Us” will still remain in the opposite end zone,

Another addition will be a knit hat that can be worn on the sidelines of Weeks 17 and 18 by players, coaches, and other personnel “to add visibility to the cause.” The hat will also be sold at retail, and “100% of the league’s proceeds will be donated to Inspire Change grant recipients.”

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Politics

Racist Rock: Boulder Removed from UW-Madison ‘Painful History of Discrimination’

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Rock

The University of Wisconsin-Madison is spending somewhere between $30,000 and $75,000 for good use; to move a rock. But not just any rock, no, this is a racist rock. “Chamberlin Rock, located on top of Observatory Hill, is named in honor of Thomas Crowder Chamberlin, a geologist and former university president” reports the Wisconsin State Journal.

However, “for some students of color on campus, the rock represents a painful history of discrimination” the article explains. The 70-ton boulder was removed from the “heart of campus” at 6:30 am Friday morning following demands from students over the past year.

The boulder will be moved to university-owned land southeast of Madison near Lake Kegonsa. In its place, the university plans to place a plaque to honor the former university president. Wisconsin State Journal reports:

The boulder was referred to as a “n——-head” — a commonly used expression in the 1920s to describe any large dark rock — at least once in a 1925 Wisconsin State Journal story. University historians have not found any other time that the term was used but said the Ku Klux Klan was active on campus at that time.

UW-Madison Chancellor Rebecca Blank approved the removal of Chamberlin Rock in January but the Wisconsin Historical Society needed to sign off on the rock’s removal because it was located within 15 feet of a Native American burial site…

… The Black Student Union led the call to remove the rock last summer. Nalah McWhorter, the group’s president and a UW-Madison senior, said in an interview this summer that the demands to remove the boulder had been around even before she arrived on campus three years ago.

“I’m grateful that we have had the opportunity to do this and that the rock will be removed,” she said. “It was our demand, and it was something that we put all the work in for.”

The Black Student Union worked with Wunk Sheek, an Indigenous student organization on campus, to lobby for the rock’s removal.

“We did all these presentations,” McWhorter said. “We went through all of these meetings during an academic year with a lot of other stuff going on, so the work really relied on us, as students, and as Black students.”

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